Wednesday, March 15, 2006

No. 20: Name that company

Hint: This company photo was taken in 1976.

13 Comments:

At 3:40 PM, Blogger jsbankston said...

I would guess Microsoft, because the geek at the lower left looks a bit like Bill Gates, enemy of books.

http://literature.sdsu.edu/
WhyLiterature/

See this damning excerpt from a Vargas Llosa essay:

..."This brings me to Bill Gates. He was in Madrid not long ago and visited the Royal Spanish Academy, which has embarked upon a joint venture with Microsoft. Among other things, Gates assured the members of the Academy that he would personally guarantee that the letter "ñ" would never be removed from computer software--a promise that allowed four hundred million Spanish speakers on five continents to breathe a sigh of relief, since the banishment of such an essential letter from cyberspace would have created monumental problems. Immediately after making his amiable concession to the Spanish language, however, Gates, before even leaving the premises of the Academy, avowed in a press conference that he expected to accomplish his highest goal before he died. That goal, he explained, is to put an end to paper and then to books.

"In his judgment, books are anachronistic objects. Gates argued that computer screens are able to replace paper in all the functions that paper has heretofore assumed. He also insisted that, in addition to being less onerous, computers take up less space, and are more easily transportable; and also that the transmission of news and literature by these electronic media, instead of by newspapers and books, will have the ecological advantage of stopping the destruction of forests, a cataclysm that is a consequence of the paper industry. People will continue to read, Gates assured his listeners, but they will read on computer screens, and consequently there will be more chlorophyll in the environment.

"I was not present at Gates's little discourse; I learned these details from the press. Had I been there I would have booed Gates for proclaiming shamelessly his intention to send me and my colleagues, the writers of books, directly to the unemployment line. And I would have vigorously disputed his analysis. Can the screen really replace the book in all its aspects? I am not so certain. I am fully aware of the enormous revolution that new technologies such as the Internet have caused in the fields of communication and the sharing of information, and I confess that the Internet provides invaluable help to me every day in my work; but my gratitude for these extraordinary conveniences does not imply a belief that the electronic screen can replace paper, or that reading on a computer can stand in for literary reading. That is a chasm that I cannot cross. I cannot accept the idea that a non-functional or non-pragmatic act of reading, one that seeks neither information nor a useful and immediate communication, can integrate on a computer screen the dreams and the pleasures of words with the same sensation of intimacy, the same mental concentration and spiritual isolation, that may be achieved by the act of reading a book.

"Perhaps this a prejudice resulting from lack of practice, and from a long association of literature with books and paper. But even though I enjoy surfing the Web in search of world news, I would never go to the screen to read a poem by Gongora or a novel by Onetti or an essay by Paz, because I am certain that the effect of such a reading would not be the same. I am convinced, although I cannot prove it, that with the disappearance of the book, literature would suffer a serious blow, even a mortal one. The term "literature" would not disappear, of course. Yet it would almost certainly be used to denote a type of text as distant from what we understand as literature today as soap operas are from the tragedies of Sophocles and Shakespeare...."

 
At 4:36 PM, Blogger SportyChick said...

I vote Gates too... whatta buncha hairy hippies (rich ones now, albeit)!

 
At 4:39 PM, Blogger TripleJ said...

Yes, yes.

 
At 5:06 PM, Blogger Luke said...

A simple "Microsoft, because that's Bill Gates at lower left" would have sufficed. But that's what I get for being -- the horror! -- an editor.

 
At 5:25 PM, Blogger CHW said...

And our beloved Blazers/Seahawks owner Paul Allen lower right.

 
At 6:21 PM, Blogger jsbankston said...

Sorry Seldom, but I've been looking for some opening to present that article here for months, and Triple J inadvertently gave it to me. I just had an axe to grind.

 
At 7:08 PM, Blogger Luke said...

I believe Vargas Llosa would have been more effective if he had simply remarked, "I mean, c'mon! Fuckin' Gates looks like a fish! He looks like Mr. Limpet...no disrespect to the late Don Knotts meant, but c'mon!"

Call a dog a dog, man!

 
At 7:33 PM, Blogger jsbankston said...

I bet Don Knotts got more tail than Sinatra. He put on that ascot tie, gave with the bedroom eyes...you know!

 
At 5:26 PM, Blogger jsbankston said...

Top row on the left--that's Wooderson, isn't it?

 
At 10:14 PM, Blogger Martin McFriend said...

Holy monkey goats!

 
At 9:56 AM, Blogger SportyChick said...

I have to ask... who's Wooderson?

 
At 3:26 PM, Blogger jsbankston said...

Matthew McConaughey's character in "Dazed and Confused."

 
At 6:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The picture shows:
Starting from the top, left: Steve Wood, Bob Wallace & Jim Lane
Next row: Bob O'Rear, Bob Greenburg, Marc McDonald & Gordon Letwin
Next row: Bill Gates, Andrea Lewis, Marla Wood & Paul Allen

 

Post a Comment

<< Home

eXTReMe Tracker